TitleThermal stress modifies the marine sponge virome
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsLaffy PW, Botté ES, Wood‐Charlson EM, Weynberg KD, Rattei T, Webster NS
JournalEnvironmental Microbiology Reports
Volume11
Issue5
Pagination690 - 698
Date PublishedJan-10-2019
ISSN1758-2229
Abstract

Marine sponges can form stable partnerships with a wide diversity of microbes and viruses, and this high intraspecies symbiont specificity makes them ideal models for exploring how host‐associated viromes respond to changing environmental conditions. Here we exposed the abundant Great Barrier Reef sponge Rhopaloiedes odorabile to elevated seawater temperature for 48 h and utilised a metaviromic approach to assess the response of the associated viral community. An increase in endogenous retro‐transcribing viruses within the Caulimorviridae and Retroviridae families was detected within the first 12 h of exposure to 32 °C, and a 30‐fold increase in retro‐transcribing viruses was evident after 48 h at 32 °C. Thermally stressed sponges also exhibited a complete loss of ssDNA viruses which were prevalent in field samples and sponges from the control temperature treatment. Despite these viromic changes, functional analysis failed to detect any loss or gain of auxiliary metabolic genes, indicating that viral communities are not providing a direct competitive advantage to their host under thermal stress. In contrast, endogenous sponge retro‐transcribing viruses appear to be replicating under thermal stress, and consistent with retroviral infections in other organisms, may be contributing to the previously described rapid decline in host health evident at elevated temperature.

URLhttps://sfamjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1758-2229.12782
DOI10.1111/emi4.v11.510.1111/1758-2229.12782
Short TitleEnvironmental Microbiology Reports

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